Parsing and ambiguity

According to Tony Blair, there is “a worrying gap between parts of Parliament and the reality of the terrorist threat and public opinion”.

This sentence is somewhat ambiguous. The context in which it makes most sense is “although parts of Parliament understand how real or otherwise the terrorist threat is, the public are overly terrified about the whole thing”. Pointing this out is a surprisingly candid admission of failure, since Mr Blair’s lies and distortions are the main reason why the public are overly terrified about the whole thing.

The alternative interpretation – that public opinion is in accordance with reality, on this subject or any other – is so patently insane that not even Mr Blair could countenance making it…

One thought on “Parsing and ambiguity

  1. Jim Bliss says:

    So Blair believes that “parts of parliament” are out of step with public opinion. Well, no argument from me on that. I suspect he and I would differ on the details though… exactly which parts of parliament.

    Also, I instinctively mistrust any analysis – yes, even that of the renowned Pigdogfucker – that suggests anything is too insane for Blair to countenance.

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